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HON306V M01 CRN  32512

(Spring 2015)

 

SCIENCE, ETHICS, & SOCIETY

(3 CREDITS)

 

Professor: Dr. Elba Serrano

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SYLLABUS: SUMMARY 

 SYLLABUS: EXTENDED

URL RESOURCES

SCHEDULE OF CLASS TOPICS  

 ASSIGNMENT DUE DATES AND POINT DISTRIBUTION

EARNING GRADES 

 MAKE UP WORK 

IMPORTANT DEADLINES

PART A.  SUMMARY SYLLABUS

INSTRUCTOR

FACULTY

Dr. Elba Serrano

·  Regents Professor of Biology

·  Ph.D.   Stanford University, Biological Sciences/Biophysics; B.S.   University of Rochester, Physics, Chemistry

·  Specialties:  Neuroscience, Biophysics; Neuroethics

·  email: serrano@nmsu.edu

·  Office:  Foster 459

·  Tel: 646-5217

 

ees.jpgAbout the Instructor:  I am a professor-scientist at New Mexico State University who enjoys teaching and working with students to further their careers.  I received my doctoral degree in neuroscience and biophysics from Stanford University and my undergraduate physics degree from the University of Rochester. My lab studies sensory disorders of hearing and balance and we have new projects developing interventions for traumatic brain injury using cell cultures derived from brain tissue.

I currently serve as the PI and PD of two  NMSU student biomedical research education grants, RISE and BRAiN.  Please do not hesitate to contact me to talk about the class, about your goals for your undergraduate degree, or any other topic where you think I could be helpful.

Students with interests in the physical and mathematical sciences,  neurobiology, data science, neuroethics,  science policy,  research education, and the intersection between art and science are encouraged to contact me about working  with my research team

SEMINAR TIME/PLACE

Wed 2:30-5:00 pm Honors 08

OFFICE HOURS

LOCATION

 Foster 459  By appointment. Sign up on door calendar for Skype or office meetinG

WEBPAGE

http://biology-web.nmsu.edu/~serrano/courses/306v2015/index.html

COMPLETE SYLLABUS

The complete syllabus is posted on the course webpage and in CANVAS. You are required to read the complete syllabus by January 28, 2015 and contact Dr. Serrano by email if you are not clear about any aspect of the syllabus. 

GOALS AND DESCRIPTION

Honors 306V is designed to encourage an understanding of science and scientific inquiry by exploring the ethical and social issues that scientists encounter during the process of scientific investigation. The course encompasses topics from many scientific disciplines, including neuroscience, engineering, computer science, medicine, and physics. Students are exposed to the interdisciplinary nature of contemporary scientific investigation and to the ethical dilemmas that can arise when scientific and technical advances have ambiguous implications for improving the quality of life.  Emphasis is placed on critical debate and written assignments. Participation in this course will encourage the student to develop her/his own ethical views regarding science and technology, and will foster awareness of multiple perspectives on ethical issues in the sciences and on the role of scientific integrity in research. This course fulfills General Education requirements. Students from outside the College of Arts and Sciences will receive credit for Viewing a Wider World.

Course activities are designed to 1) establish a foundation in scientific  ethics and responsible conduct in research; 2) increase student ability to integrate, synthesize and communicate knowledge in oral and written format, 3) develop student ability to apply ethics principles to analysis of STEM research and its implications; 4) enable students to identify themes of personal interest in science and ethics; 5) develop a historical and cultural perspective on scientific research and scientific ethics; and 7) increase student awareness of the social, and ethical implications of scientific discoveries.

The 2015 course will emphasize discussion of the following topics:  neuroethics, robotics, global science, cybersecurity, STEM economics.

REQUIRED

SUPPLIES

·        Laptop computer  with internet streaming capability

·        Used for in class and home assignments. Bring to class weekly

REQUIRED TEXTBOOKS:

 

·        Fundamentals of Ethics for Scientists and Engineers (Seebauer and Barry)
ISBN-10: 0195134885; ISBN-13: 978-0195134889

·        Bioethics: An Introduction (Talbott)
ISBN-10: 0521714591; ISBN-13: 978-0521714594

·        Defining Right and Wrong in Brain Science- Essential Readings  in Neuroethics (Glannon)
ISBN-10: 1932594256; ISBN-13: 978-1932594256

·        Textbooks can be obtained at the bookstore or online from vendors such as Amazon ecampus or Campus Bookstore

Recommended Textbooks

Thought-provoking books 
for your personal library, 
term papers and presentations.

·        Bioethics for Beginners: 60 Cases and Cautions from the Moral Frontier of Healthcare (2012) by Glenn McGee (Author)ISBN-10: 0470659114 ISBN-13: 978-0470659113

·        Science, Policy, and the Value-Free Ideal  (2009) by Heather Douglas (Author)  ISBN-10: 0822960265; ISBN-13: 978-0822960263

·        Value-Free Science?: Ideals and Illusion (2007)by Harold Kincaid (Editor), John Dupre (Editor), Alison Wylie (Editor)
 ISBN-10: 0195308964; ISBN-13: 978-0195308969

·        Advice for a Young Investigator by Santiago Ramon y Cajal, (1898) MIT Press, ISBN 978-0262681506   

·        The Black Box Society: The Secret Algorithms That Control Money and Information by Frank Pasquale(2015) ISBN-13: 978-0674368279

·        Computer Ethics (4th Edition) by Deborah G. Johnson (2009)ISBN-13: 978-0131112414

·        Environmental Ethics: An Anthology by Light, Rolston   (2002)   Blackwell Publishers   ISBN: 0631222944

·        Ethics for the New Millenium,, Dalai Lama, Riverhead ISBN: 1573228834

·        Fast Food Nation The Dark Side of the All-American Meal,  Eric Schlosser, 2001  HarperCollins   ISBN: 0060938455

·        Guns, Germs, and Steel: The Fates of Human Societies, by Jared Diamond (1999)  W.W. Norton & Company  ISBN: 0393317552

·        In the Name of Eugenics: Genetics and the Uses of Human Heredity by Daniel J. Kevles (1986)  University of California Press  ASIN: 0520057635

·        The Innovators: How a Group of Hackers, Geniuses, and Geeks Created the Digital Revolution by Walter Isaacson (2014) ISBN-13: 978-1476708690

·        Ishmael, by Daniel Quinn 1995, Bantam Books ISBN: 0553375407

·        Nanoethics: The Ethical and Social Implications of Nanotechnology (2007) by Allhof et al., ISBN: 0470084170

·        Nanotechnology: Science, Innovation, and Opportunity (2005) by Lynn Foster,ISBN  978-0131927568

·        Racial Hygiene,  by Robert Proctor (1988)  Harvard University Press  ISBN 0-674-74578-7

·        Racial Hygiene: Medicine Under the Nazis,  by Robert Proctor (1988)  Harvard University Press  ISBN 0-674-74578-7 

·        Science and Other Cultures, by Harding, Figueroa (2003)  Routledge   ISBN: 0415939917

·        The Baltimore Case: A Trial of Politics, Science, and Character by Daniel J. Kevles (2000) W.W. Norton & Company   ISBN: 0393319709

·        The Demon in the Freezer: A True Story, by Richard Preston ( 2002)  Random House   ISBN: 0375508562

·        The Making of the Atomic Bomb (1984), by Richard Rhodes, Simon & Schuster ISBN: 978-0684813783

·        21st Century Complete Guide to Bioterrorism, Biological and Chemical Weapons, Germs and Germ Warfare, Nuclear and Radiation Terrorism (2001)  Progressive Management ISBN: 1931828091

other learning materials

Posted in Canvas:  Supplemental reading

Internet: articles and videos

NMSU COPYRIGHT GUIDE

Essentials: http://nmsu.libguides.com/content.php?pid=60019&sid=441190

Fair Use: http://nmsu.libguides.com/content.php?pid=60019&sid=449716

EMAIL

The instructor does not use CANVAS for email. Contact Dr. Serrano via serrano AT nmsu DOT edu

Official communication to you will often come through your NMSU e-mail box.  Please access it regularly, or forward email to your current use address, as your success in college may depend on your ability to respond quickly.

EARNING GRADES

YOU MAY EARN A TOTAL OF 1300 POINTS AS FOLLOWS:

·        480 Attendance and in class participation (40 pts per class; maximum of 480 pts; lowest two scores will be dropped:

 Students are expected to be prepared for class, to contribute to class discussion, activities as session moderator, group leader, and debate participant.  Three  kinds of assignments will be important

o   Class preparation. Students must submit brief written and other preparatory assignments weekly in class or occasionally in CANVAS. Assignments will be incorporated into class discussion.

o   Presentations. Students will make brief presentations alone or in teams based on assigned readings and analysis of case studies

o   Debates. During the semester, the class may divide into teams to debate controversial topics of interest to the students.

·        120 Reflective Writing (10 pts each; maximum of 120 pts; lowest two scores will be dropped):). Due every Friday, short reflections or blogs on week’s class or assigned topics: 100-200 words.

·        400 Portfolio assignment: (400 pts; 2 @ 200 pts each) Students will be asked to prepare a portfolio during the course. The objective of this assignment is for students to explore their own values and ethics in the context of scientific issues that are raised by media articles, TV programs, science classes, lab exercises, research experiences etc.  The portfolio will be comprised of selected class assignments, some mini-essays and a few "discovery" style essay letters.  Details of the portfolio entries will be posted on the Portfolio web page and links to the assignments will be available from the syllabus and assignments schedule tables.

·        250 Capstone Paper  (250 pts; abstract, 25 points; draft, 75 pts; final 150 pts)

·        50 Capstone Presentation (class choice TBA, finals week)

GRADE SCALE

Grades will be calculated based on a total of 1300 points without fractional grading and according to the following scale:

                A      (> 90%)

                B      (80%-89%)

                C      (70%-79%)

                D      (60%-69%)

                F       (<60%)

Note:     The grade scale may be curved at the end of the semester at the discretion of the instructor

S/U OPTION:

You must earn at least a C (910 POINTS)

MAKEUP WORK

 

·        There will be no makeup for in class assignments. Don't miss  class if you wish to earn these points.

·        If you are ill, or must miss a class for a university-sanctioned function, you must inform the instructor in writing before class. Leaving early for a vacation does not count as an excused absence. Please make travel plans, including purchase of non-refundable airline tickets with this in mind. 

·        If you have an emergency that prevents you from notifying the instructor in advance, contact the instructor within 48 hours of the class. 

·        All absences from class for which you request an excuse must be documented in writing with an explanation, signed by you, and with additional documents form a third person (MD, minister, court clerk) as appropriate. 

·        Petition documents must be uploaded in CANVAS under Assignments/Excuses

·        If you miss an in class assignment with a legitimate excuse, the score from the other in class assignments will be used to calculate a pro-rated score for the in class assignment you missed.

ATTENDANCE

This is an Honors seminar that meets 14 times during the semester and during finals week You are required to attend class.

WITHDRAWAL

 

It is your responsibility to withdraw from the course. The instructor will not automatically drop you from the course for failure to attend class or to complete exams or assignments.  Failure to fill out the paperwork may result in an F grade. 

LATE ASSIGNMENTS

20% of the total points will be deducted for late assignments.

Assignments will not be accepted if handed in more than 7 calendar days after the due date and time.

PLEASE BE COURTEOUS

·        If you come to class, stay the duration; if you must leave early, sit near an exit so that you do not disturb other students when you leave. 

·        In this small room, even whispering to your friend makes it difficult for others to hear who is speaking, please refrain from speaking while others are doing so.. 

·        Please turn off cellular phones and pagers so they do not ring in class.

SYLLABUS MODIFICATION

The instructor reserves the right to modify this syllabus during the semester as considered necessary to enhance the quality of the instruction, to meet the needs of students in the class, and to achieve course objectives. Any changes to the syllabus (or to the course schedule) will be announced in class and students are responsible for being aware of them.

 

PART B. ADDITIONAL SYLLABUS  ITEMS

contact PROFESSOR SERRANO

Students are encouraged to meet with the instructor either after class, during scheduled office hours, or by Skype to discuss Honors 306V and/or other academic or career topics.  

EMAIL THE INSTRUCTOR

All questions and correspondence to Dr. Serrano should be directed by email, not CANVAS. The use of CANVAS will be limited to posting grades and supplemental materials and occasional submission of capstone assignments.

·        Professor Serrano serrano AT nmsu DOT edu

GENERAL EDUCATION

This course is certified as Viewing a Wider World course.

http://nmsu.smartcatalogiq.com/en/2014-2015/Undergraduate-Catalog/General-Information/Required-Courses/NMSU-Viewing-a-Wider-World-Courses  VWW courses are intended to foster intelligent inquiry, abstract logical thinking, critical analysis and the integration and synthesis of knowledge; it strives for literacy in writing, reading, speaking, and listening; it teaches mathematical structures, acquainting students with precise abstract thought about numbers and space; it encourages an understanding of science and scientific inquiry; it provides a historical consciousness, including an understanding of one’s own heritage as well as respect for other peoples and cultures; it includes an examination of values and stresses the importance of a carefully considered values system; it fosters an appreciation of the arts; and general education provides the breadth necessary to have a familiarity with the various branches of human understanding. All VWW courses can be identified by the V suffix. Prior to graduating, NMSU students are required to take two courses from separate colleges from the Viewing a Wider World list in the Undergraduate Catalog. These courses are upper-division (300-400 level) General Education courses and should be taken in a student’s junior and/or senior year. One of the two courses must be in a college other than their own. The other course may be taken within their home college, but this course (1) must be in a different department from their major department; (2) must not be cross-listed with a course in their home department; (3) cannot be counted as one of the requirements for the student’s major. These courses strongly emphasize the international character and multicultural influences in the fields of study and strengthen information retrieval skills.

COURSE WEBSITE

The course website provides easy access to the course syllabus and to events and resources for student learning

http://biology-web.nmsu.edu/~serrano/courses/306v2015/index.html

CANVAS

·        Course materials etc are uploaded in CANVAS in the Files Tab. You can check your total points in the gradebook.

IMPORTANT deadlines

Feb 18   Capstone essay abstract Feb 18

Mar 4     Portfolio  1   March 4 (200 pts)

Mar 18   Capstone essay draft Mar 18

Apr 29    Portfolio 2    April 15 (200 pts)

Apr 29    Capstone essay final Apr 29

May 6     FINAL class Wednesday May 6

 

·        In class graded activities and assignments comprise 480 pts.  You must be present to earn these points and there will be no makeups. However, if you miss a class with a legitimate and documented excuse, the prorated average of your other in-class points will be recorded for the class you missed.

·        You will receive receipts for written assignments. Be sure to keep receipts in a safe place because the receipts will serve as proof that your assignment was submitted.

check your points:  

Your earned points will be posted online in CANVAS as quickly as possible.

My target goal is to record your grade within 10 days of submission if not sooner but I  will not compromise accuracy for speed.

GRADING ERRORS

·        It is your responsibility to check your scores as they are posted on CANVAS.

·        If you have a question about a particular score, please let Dr. Serrano know by sending an email to serrano@nmsu.edu within 7 calendar days after the scores are posted so that any questions can be promptly resolved.

·        After 7 calendar days, there is no guarantee that any action can be taken

Incomplete grades. 

The current catalog states “Instructors may assign I grades only if the student is unable to complete the course due to circumstances beyond the student’s control that develop after the last day to withdraw from the course. Examples of appropriate circumstances include documented illness, documented death or crisis in the student’s immediate family, and similar circumstances. Job related circumstances are generally not appropriate grounds for assigning an I grade. In no case is an I grade to be used to avoid the assigning of D, F, U , or RR grades for marginal or failing work.”

 

Complete information regarding the Incomplete grade can be found in the catalog:  http://nmsu.smartcatalogiq.com/en/2014-2015/Undergraduate-Catalog/General-Information/Regulations/Incomplete-Grade

Dropping the course

It is your responsibility to withdraw from the course. The instructor will not automatically drop you from the course for failure to attend class or to complete exams or assignments.  Failure to fill out the paperwork may result in an F grade. 

ADD/DR0P DATES

·        The deadline for registration/ course addition with instructor’s permission is Tuesday, January 27, 2015.

·        The last day to drop a course with a W (except courses carrying designated dates) Monday March 16, 2015  

·        The last day to Withdraw from the University is Friday, April 17, 2015.

ATTENDANCE

You are required to attend class and participate in all activities, as this is your opportunity to both earn class participation points and to get the most out of the class. Note also the University expectation regarding attendance, found in the current Undergraduate Catalog: “Students are expected to attend regularly all classes for which they are registered”. You are responsible for all the material (including announcements of schedule or other syllabus changes) presented in class.

If you do miss a class, please be sure to obtain notes from another student, review the reading assignment and then, once you have completed this review process, contact Dr. Serrano if you have any remaining questions. 

UNPLANNED ABSENCES

Contact Dr. Serrano as soon as possible after an illness or emergency that causes you to unexpectedly miss an exam. Be ready to provide written documentation from a doctor or other professional online in CANVAS

SCHEDULED ABSENCES FOR UNIVERSITY BUSINESS

Students who miss course work to participate in an official university function must take the following steps:

·        Speak with Dr. Serrano, after class, during office hours or by appointment at least one week prior to missing class.

·        For each absence, at least 4 days before you leave, upload a copy of your official NMSU form with your name, when you will be absent, the nature of the event, your signature and your supervisor’s signature in CANVAS under Assignments/Excuses

Getting the most out of the CLASS

·        This course covers a great deal of material. You are responsible for the in class material as well as the reading assignments.

·        It is not always possible for your instructor to cover every topic in great depth in class, thus you will need to use the assigned materials to develop your OWN thorough understanding of the course material.

·        Use the assignments as a guide for your reading and to help you understand the material that we cover together in class.

·        It is highly recommended that you review your class notes as soon after each class as possible. Use this time to supplement your seminar notes with additional helpful information from the reading material.

·        To be sure that you understand the material, form study groups (help each other learn).

·        Come to Dr. Serrano’s  student office hours to ask any questions and clarify any information.

·        I am here to help you and I enjoy this aspect of my job as a professor!

How to prepare a paper for class discussion

To really appreciate an article or paper, you will need to read it at least twice. There are many approaches and with time you will develop your own.  Here are some suggested strategies:

·        Be sure you can restate the keypoints made by the author as she/he has made them (the first read of the paper). what part of the article is" factual"? opinion?

·        what ethical dilemmas are raised?

·        what new insights did you gain from this paper?

·        what points or positions did you disagree with?

·        what arguments or viewpoints did  the author omitted?

·        what did you think of the writing style?

·        if you had one question you could ask the author in person, what would it be?

·        rank the paper (1) excellent, worth my time and I gained a lot (2) average paper, some good points but some weaknesses (3) not a strong paper,  wish I had gone rollerblading instead…

How to pass this course with a "C" or better:

 

1.       Attend all classes.

2.       Plan your time, allow at least 2-4 hours of study time per week outside of class. 

3.       Take thorough notes that emphasize the main points during class discussion.

4.       Keep up with the material.  Don't wait until the weekend before the capstone assignment is due  to prepare. 

5.       Schedule time with the course Instructor.  I am here to help you master the material.

6.       Visit the Student Success Center http://ssc.nmsu.edu/  to improve study skills. Courses and workshops are FREE!

PLAGIARISM

Plagiarism is using another person's work without acknowledgment, making it appear to be one's own. Intentional and unintentional instances of plagiarism are considered instances of academic misconduct and are subject to disciplinary action such as failure on the assignment, failure of the course or dismissal from the university. The NMSU Library has more information and help on how to avoid plagiarism at http://lib.nmsu.edu/plagiarism/

CODE OF CONDUCT:

 

 

 

MISCONDUCT

 

The current Student Code of Conduct definition of plagiarism can be found at:

            http://deanofstudents.nmsu.edu/student-handbook/1-student-code-of-conduct/index.html

 

 It reads as follows:

Any student found guilty of academic misconduct shall be subject to disciplinary action. Academic misconduct includes, but is not limited to, the following actions:

1.       Cheating or knowingly assisting another student in committing an act of cheating or other forms of academic dishonesty.

2.       Plagiarism is using another person's work without acknowledgment, making it appear to be one's own. Any ideas, words, pictures, or other source must be acknowledged in a citation that gives credit to the source. This is true no matter where the material comes from, including the internet, other student's work, unpublished materials, or oral sources. Intentional and unintentional instances of plagiarism are considered instances of academic misconduct. It is the responsibility of the student submitting the work in question to know, understand, and comply with this policy. If no citation is given, then borrowing any of the following would be an example of plagiarism:

o   An idea or opinion, even when put into one's own words (paraphrase)

o   A few well-said words, if these are a unique insight

o   Many words, even if one changes most of them

o   Materials assembled by others, for instance quotes or a bibliography

o   An argument

o   A pattern or idea

o   Graphs, pictures, or other illustrations

o   Facts

o   All or part of an existing paper or other resource

This list is not meant to include all possible examples of plagiarism. See the University Library's web page on plagiarism for further examples.

3.       Unauthorized possession of examinations, reserve library materials, laboratory materials, or other course-related materials.

4.       Unauthorized changing of grades on an examination, in an instructor's grade book, or on a grade report; or unauthorized access to academic computer records.

5.       Nondisclosure or misrepresentation in filling out applications or other University records in, or for, academic departments or colleges.

Students who engage in disruptive activities in an academic setting (e.g., classrooms, academic offices or academic buildings) are subject to disciplinary action in accordance with Section IV-Non Academic Misconduct-All Students. Such students are also subject to administrative actions in accordance with the NMSU Graduate and Undergraduate Catalogs..”

EDUCATIONAL TECHNOLOGY RESOURCES.

 http://help.nmsu.edu/    The ICT Help Desk in room 141 of the Computer Center provides walk-in support for many common software and desktop computer issues, including network connection problems and Blackboard and myNMSU support ICT Customer Service Center is equipped to deal with all of your information technology (IT) and telecommunications needs at NMSU.  Their hours of operation are from 8am-8pm Monday through Friday, 10am-3pm Saturday (not open Sunday).  Please feel free to contact them at 646-1840 or via e-mail at help@nmsu.edu. You can also go to the Student Technology Help web page http://studenttech.nmsu.edu

AMERICANS with Disabilities. 

 

Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the Americans with Disabilities Act Amendments Act (ADAAA) covers issues relating to disability and accommodations. If a student has questions or needs an accommodation in the classroom (all medical information is treated confidentially), contact:

 

Trudy Luken, Director

Student Accessibility Services (SAS) - Corbett Center, Rm. 244

Phone: (575) 646-6840 E-mail: sas@nmsu.edu

Website:  http://sas.nmsu.edu/

 

NMSU policy prohibits discrimination on the basis of age, ancestry, color, disability, gender identity, genetic information, national origin, race, religion, retaliation, serious medical condition, sex, sexual orientation, spousal affiliation and protected veterans status.

 

Furthermore, Title IX prohibits sex discrimination to include sexual misconduct: sexual violence (sexual assault, rape), sexual harassment and retaliation.

 

For more information on discrimination issues, Title IX, Campus SaVE Act, NMSU Policy Chapter 3.25, NMSU's complaint process, or to file a complaint contact:

 

Gerard Nevarez, Title IX Coordinator

Agustin Diaz, Title IX Deputy Coordinator

Office of Institutional Equity (OIE) - O'Loughlin House, 1130 University Avenue

Phone: (575) 646-3635 E-mail: equity@nmsu.edu

Website: http://www.nmsu.edu/~eeo/

HONORS COMPUTER CLUSTER

 is available for your use

HONORS COLLEGE INFORMATION:

The Honors College Dean is Dr. Miriam Chaiken.  Her office is in the Honors main office.  (X62005)   Ms. Valerie Torres and Ms. Yvonne Flores are Honors College staff.

IMPORTANT NMSU PHONE NUMBERS

NMSU Police Department:              (575) 646-3311 www.nmsupolice.com

NMSU Police Victim Services:         (575) 646-3424

NMSU Counseling Center:               (575) 646-2731

NMSU Dean of Students:             (575) 646-1722

For Any On-campus Emergencies:            911

SYLLABUS MODIFICATION

The instructor reserves the right to modify this syllabus during the semester as considered necessary to enhance the quality of the instruction, to meet the needs of students in the class, and to achieve course objectives. Any changes to the syllabus (or to the course schedule) will be announced in class and students are responsible for being aware of them.

 

 

 

SCHEDULE OF CLASSES  AND ASSIGNMENTS

 

JAN

21

28

FEB

4

11

18

25

MAR

4

11

18

25

APR

1

8

15

22

29

MAY

6

 

 

PART 1: PROFESSIONAL CONDUCT AND RESEARCH INTEGRITY

 

 

 

Jan 21

 

INTRODUCTION                     
ETHICAL REASONING
PERSONAL ETHICS  

Overview of course content, expectations and requirements
Developing ethical reasoning skills       

Case studies

Jan 28

 

PROFESSIONAL ETHICS

SCIENTIFIC INTEGRITY 

CAPSTONE ESSAY PREPARATION

Codes of Ethics: Comparisons of student disciplines                                 

Introduction to Scientific Misconduct and Research Integrity

Feb 4

 

SCIENTIFIC INTEGRITY 

RESPONSIBLE CONDUCT IN RESEARCH

Ethics and the Scientist:     * Regulations  * Consequences for misconduct   * Highlights from national cases

Research Integrity:    * Mentoring    *Scientific Record Keeping * Authorship and peer review

Feb 11

 

RESPONSIBLE CONDUCT IN RESEARCH

Mentor-mentee dynamics Part 1

Research Integrity:  * Collaborative research  * Conflicts of interest   * Ownership of data and intellectual property

Feb 18

Essay abstract and references

SCIENTIFIC INTEGRITY 

RESPONSIBLE CONDUCT IN RESEARCH

Mentor-mentee dynamics Part 2

Science and Ethics on the Internet:
    * Database development and global sharing of knowledge
    * Ownership, publishing, veracity of information on the net
    * ELSI and AAAS Ethics Web sites

Feb 25

USE OF ORGANISMS IN RESEARCH

Humans and Animals in experimentation

Mar 4

Portfolio 1

USE OF ORGANISMS IN RESEARCH

 

Humans and Animals in experimentation

Human Genome Project

PART 2: ETHICAL AND SOCIAL ISSUES

Mar 11

 

GENETICS

Eugenics: historical perspectives

Race and IQ

Genetic Engineering

Mar 18

 

 

 

BUSINESS OF SCIENCE:

RESEARCH ECONOMICS

PUBLIC AND PRIVATE SECTOR

 

Intellectual Property

Scientific direction: What kind of science gets done and who decides?
Economics: Federal and private funding of research
    * Government agencies: NSF, NIH, ARO, DOE ( genome project), CDC, USDA
    * Industry
    * Foundations
    * Research funds and educational institutions
Public policy development
Privatization: Pharmaceutical Industry/Biofuels/Crop plants
    * Economic base
    * Best seller" pharmaceutical and seed products (Prozac, Ritalin, Contraceptives, Steroids, Viagra, BT-corn, Roundup ready)

Mar 25

SPRING BREAK!

 

Apr 1

Essay draft

 

WEAPONS OF MASS DESTRUCTION

 

Overview  Weapons, War and Terrorism

Biological and Nuclear Weapons

Case Study: Manhattan Project

Apr 8

WEAPONS OF MASS DESTRUCTION

NEUROETHICS

Chemical and Informatics Weapons

Case Study: Cybersecurity

 

Introduction to Neuroscience & Neuroethics:

Apr 15

NEUROETHICS

Introduction to Neuroscience & Neuroethics:

 

Apr 22

NEUROETHICS

NeuroGenetics & Neuroimaging: Profiling, Privacy, Choice

NeuroEnhancement Technologies:NeuroPharmacology & Neural Implants

Pain, Brain Death, Neural Stimulation

April 29

Final Essay

PORTFOLIO 2

SCIENCE AND PUBLIC POLICY

Artificial Intelligence: Robotics

Right to Live/Right to Die

 

Equity in Science-Who gets to do science?

Global Perspectives: Regenerative medicine (organs; stem cells)

MAY 6:

WEDNESDAY

FINALS WEEK

 

 

FINAL CLASS

1:00 – 3:00 pm

 

Capstone presentations:

 

 

 

 

 

 

SCHEDULE OF ASSIGNMENT POINT DISTRIBUTION

CLASS PARTICIPATION

WEEKLY REFLECTION

PORTFOLIO

PAPER

Final

each

40

10

200

25, 75, 150

50

total

480

120

400

250

50

Jan

21-Jan

23-Jan

 ---

 ---

 ---

28-Jan

30-Jan

 ---

 ---

 ---

Feb

4-Feb

6-Feb

 ---

 ---

 ---

11-Feb

13-Feb

 ---

 ---

 ---

18-Feb

20-Feb

 ---

18-Feb

 ---

25-Feb

27-Feb

 ---

 ---

 ---

Mar

4-Mar

6-Mar

4-Mar

 ---

 ---

11-Mar

13-Mar

 ---

 ---

 ---

18-Mar

20-Mar

 ---

---

 ---

Spring Break 25-Mar

Spring Break 27-Mar

 ---

 ---

 ---

Apr

1-Apr

3-Apr

 ---

1-Apr

 ---

8-Apr

10-Apr

 ---

 ---

 ---

15-Apr

17-Apr

 ---

 ---

 ---

22-Apr

24-Apr

 ---

 ---

 ---

29-Apr

29-Apr

 29-Apr

29-Apr

 ---

May

 ---

1-May

 ---

 ---

6-May