Biology 540 
Fall 2007  1 credit


SCIENCE AND ETHICS

 

Eugenics Tree

 

    E. E. Serrano
     Sept 11 – Nov 13
     Tuesdays  10:20-11:55 am
     Conroy Honors Building Rm 205

Updated 11/02/07

 

 

 

Instructions for JOURNAL and CASE STUDIES 

Important dates:
   NOV 27: CASE STUDIES INSTRUCTIONS New
DEC 4:JOURNAL INSTRUCTIONS New
  

FINAL EXAM

        Thursday December 13 10:30-12:30 am

        Bring printouts (6 slides per page) of your 2 group presentations to the final 

 

 

 

 

 

 

GOALS: This course will provide an introduction to the field of scientific ethics for graduate students.  Students will be asked to examine the role of the scientist in society and to become aware of the complex ethical issues facing scientists engaged in research. Class sessions emphasize student participation and debate and use case studies as a format for discussion.  The course will focus on the ethical dilemmas that can arise from professional interactions in the workplace including scientific misconduct, advisor/student relationships, intellectual property, conflicts of interest, data ownership and management etc. This year’s special ethical topics include stem cell research, biofuels and nanoscience. The goals of this course are to provide students with a practical foundation in responsible conduct in research, and to encourage students to critically examine and evaluate the impact and consequences of scientific research. 

 

Instructor

Dr. Elba Serrano
Ph. D. Stanford University
Professor of Biology, NMSU
Research Interests: Neuroscience, Biophysics, Nanoscience

Office

Jett Hall 151

Office hours

Mon. & Wed. 11:30-1:00 pm  and by appointment

Telephone

646-5217

email

serrano@nmsu.edu

RequiredTextbooks:

Scientific Integrity, Macrina, 2006

Fundamentals of Ethics for Scientists and Engineers, Seebauer and Barry, 2001

RecommendedTextbooks :

Thought-provoking books 
for your personal library

         Racial Hygiene, by Robert Proctor (1988) Harvard University Press ISBN 0-674-74578-7

         Guns, Germs, and Steel: The Fates of Human Societies, by Jared Diamond (1999) W.W. Norton & Company ISBN: 0393317552

         Advice for a Young Investigator by Santiago Ramon y Cajal, (1898) MIT Press, ISBN 978-0262681506

         The Making of the Atomic Bomb (1984), by Richard Rhodes, Simon & Schuster ISBN: 978-0684813783

         Nanotechnology: A Gentle Introduction to the Next Big Idea (2002), by Mark Ratner, ISBN: 978-0131014008

         Nanotechnology: Science, Innovation, and Opportunity (2005) by Lynn Foster,ISBN 978-0131927568

         Racial Hygiene: Medicine Under the Nazis, by Robert Proctor (1988) Harvard University Press ISBN 0-674-74578-7

         Science and Other Cultures, by Harding, Figueroa (2003) Routledge ISBN: 0415939917

         The Baltimore Case: A Trial of Politics, Science, and Character by Daniel J. Kevles (2000) W.W. Norton & Company ISBN: 0393319709

         In the Name of Eugenics: Genetics and the Uses of Human Heredity by Daniel J. Kevles (1986) University of California Press ASIN: 0520057635

         Environmental Ethics: An Anthology by Light, Rolston (2002) Blackwell Publishers ISBN: 0631222944

         21st Century Complete Guide to Bioterrorism, Biological and Chemical Weapons, Germs and Germ Warfare, Nuclear and Radiation Terrorism (2001) Progressive Management ISBN: 1931828091

         The Demon in the Freezer: A True Story, by Richard Preston ( 2002) Random House ISBN: 0375508562

         Fast Food Nation The Dark Side of the All-American Meal, Eric Schlosser, 2001 HarperCollins ISBN: 0060938455

         Ishmael, by Daniel Quinn 1995, Bantam Books ISBN: 0553375407

Textbook Vendors

Textbooks can be obtained at the bookstore or online from vendors such as Amazon and ecampus or Best Book Buys

SCHEDULE OF CLASSES

Sept 11

Course Introduction
Analytical Frameworks

Ethics and the scientist
Analyzing ethical dilemmas

Sept 18
ASSIGNMENT

Analytical Frameworks
Scientific Integrity

Analyzing ethical dilemmas
Research Integrity and Scientific Misconduct

Scientific Record keeping

Sept  25
ASSIGNMENT

Ethics and Philosophy
Scientific Integrity
 

Historical perspectives

Ethics in the classroom
Mentoring of Students

Oct 2
ASSIGNMENT

Scientific Integrity

Professional Codes of Conduct 
Workplace Conduct

Oct 9
ASSIGNMENT


Scientific Integrity

Competing Interests

Collaborative Research

Introduction to Eugenics: Lynchburg Colony

Oct 16
ASSIGNMENT

Scientific Integrity

Funding for research

Ownership of data

Intellectual Property

Oct 23

Fall break

 

Oct 30
ASSIGNMENT

Scientific Integrity

Guidelines for use of animals and humans in research

Genetic Testing

Eugenics and Human experimentation

Nov 6
ASSIGNMENT

Student presentations

Bioterrorism/Chemical Weapons

Biofuels

Genetically Engineered Crops

Group 1

Group 2

Group 3

Nov 13 last class
ASSIGNMENT

Student presentations

Nanobioscience

Stem Cells

Race and IQ

Group 1

Group 2

Group 3

Nov 27

Submit Case Studies

in Foster 275 Serrano mailbox before 5pm (Biology Office)

Dec 4

Submit Journal  

in Foster 275 Serrano mailbox before 5pm (Biology Office)

Thursday December 13

10:30-12:30 am

Class meets for two hours
In class  written exam (open book, notes)

Open book essay questions. Bring printouts (6 slides per page) of your 2 group presentations to the final Your final exam grade will be the HIGHER of the following two: a) your actual score on the final exam OR b) a prorated score based on your combined journal and case studies scores (Example: 80 points Case Studies and 130 points Journal = 210/275 = 76% = 57 points Final Exam prorated score)

 

Grading: A total of 500 pts may be earned during the course.

Grade Scale:

A 450-500 pts
B 400-449 pts
C 350-399 pts
D 300-349 pts
F < 300 pts
S (Satisfactory) requires a C-
Note: The grade scale may be curved at the end of the semester at the discretion of the instructor.

 

In class participation: (150  pts) Based on your contribution to class discussion, activities as session moderator or group leader and evidence of preparedness for class.

Case studies (100 points) Students will be required to submit a written analysis of case studies assigned by the instructor from the textbooks. A cover essay will be part of this assignment.  Details of the case studies will be posted here.  Instructions link DUE DATE: November 27

Journal assignment: (175 pts) Students will be required to maintain a mini-journal on a topic of their choice during the course. The objective of this assignment is for students to explore their own values and ethics in the context of scientific issues that are raised by media articles, TV programs, science classes, lab exercises, research experiences etc. Details of the journal will be posted  here. INSTRUCTIONS link   DUE DATE: December 4 

 

Final Exam (75 points). Open book essay questions. Bring printouts (6 slides per page) of your 2 group presentations to the final Your final exam grade will be the HIGHER of the following two: a) your actual score on the final exam OR b) a prorated score based on your combined journal and case studies scores (Example: 80 points Case Studies and 130 points Journal = 210/275 = 76% = 57 points Final Exam prorated score)

 

Late assignments. 10% of the total points will be deducted for each week the assignment is late. Assignments will not be accepted if handed in more than 2 weeks after the due date. Case studies and Journals will not be accepted after the Final Exam.

 

Attendance: Debate and discussion are essential components of this class, therefore, students are expected to attend all classes.

25 points will be deducted from your overall points for each unexcused absence.

Important dates:

Nov 27:  Case studies due Instructions
Nov 27: Journal  due
Instructions

Exam week Dec 13:  Final Exam. Class will meet from 10:30-12:30

 

Withdrawals: It is your responsibility to withdraw from the course. The instructor will not automatically drop you from the course for failure to attend class or to complete exams or assignments.

 

Incompletes, academic misconduct, and make-up work: Incompletes will be given only if a student has passed the first half of the course (assignments through October 16) and is precluded from completing the course by a documented illness or family crisis. Make-ups of assignments for excused absences must be discussed with the instructor within one week of the due date of the assignment. There are no provisions for extra credit work. Students found guilty of academic misconduct, shall be subject to disciplinary action.

 

PLAGIARISM: Students found guilty of plagiarism have engaged in academic misconduct and shall be subject to disciplinary action. The penalty for plagiarism or other forms of academic misconduct (as defined in the Student Code of Conduct) is failure of the course: no exceptions. The current University definition of plagiarism can be found at http://www.nmsu.edu/%7Evpsa/SCOC/misconduct.html .  It reads as follows:

 

Plagiarism is using another person’s work without acknowledgment, making it appear to be one’s own.  Any ideas, words, pictures, or other intellectual content taken from another source must be acknowledged in a citation that gives credit to the source. This is irrespective of the origin of the material, including the Internet, other students’ work, unpublished materials, or oral sources.  Intentional and unintentional instances of plagiarism are considered instances of academic misconduct. It is the responsibility of the student submitting the work in question to know, understand, and comply with this policy.If no citation is given, then borrowing any of the following would be an example of plagiarism.:

 

- an idea or opinion, even when put into one’s own words (paraphrase)

- a few well-said words, if these are a unique insight

- many words, even if one changes most of them

- materials assembled by others, for instance quotes or a bibliography

- an argument

- a pattern of ideas

- graphs, pictures, or other illustrations

- facts

- all or part of an existing paper or other resource

 

* This list is not meant to include all possible examples of plagiarism.

 

Even with a citation, failure to put quotation marks around direct quotations also constitutes plagiarism, because it implies that the writing is your own.   Material should either be paraphrased or clearly designated as a quotation.   Note that replacing words with synonyms, changing verb tense or other minor alterations do not qualify as paraphrasing.

 

OTHER:

 

GUIDELINES FOR CLASS DISCUSSION: During the semester, many opinions will be voiced in the class. You may strongly disagree with some of these, or you may find them amusing. Outbursts can be misinterpreted or counterproductive to meaningful and thoughtful debate. Therefore, it is important that you exercise self-discipline and self-control, and treat all members of the class with the courtesy that you are entitled to receive in turn. The key words are: respect and courtesy. Please turn off cell phones and beepers while in class.       Thank you!

 

SYLLABUS MODIFICATION: The instructor reserves the right to modify this syllabus during the semester as considered necessary to enhance the quality of the instruction, to meet the needs of students in the class and to achieve course objectives. Any changes to the syllabus [or to the course schedule] will be announced in class and you are responsible for being aware of them.

 

STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES:   Additional information is available at http://www.nmsu.edu/~ssd/

  • If you have or believe you have a disability and would benefit from any accommodations, you may wish to self-identify by contacting the Services for Students with Disabilities (SSD) Office located at Corbett Center (phone: 646-6840).
  • If you have already registered, please make sure that your instructor receives a copy of the accommodation memorandum from SSD within the first two weeks of classes.  It is your responsibility to inform either your instructor or SSD representative in a timely manner if services/accommodations provided are not meeting your needs.
  • If you have a condition which may affect your ability to exit safely from the premises in an emergency or which may cause an emergency during class, you are encouraged to discuss any concerns with the instructor and/or the SSD Coordinator.

 

EQUITY:  Feel free to call Jerry Nevarez, Director of Institutional Equity, at 505-646-3635 with any questions you may have about NMSU's Non-Discrimination Policy and complaints of discrimination, including sexual harassment.

 

ADA:   Feel free to call Michael Armendariz, Coordinator of  Services for Students with Disabilities, at 505-646-6840 with any questions you may have on student issues related to the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) and/or Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973.  All medical information will be treated confidentially.

 

XEROX and/or BACKUP all assignments before submitting them to the instructor.

 

SAVE xeroxes of all graded assignments and exams from this course at least until you have received your final grade.

DEPARTMENT OFFICE:     The Biology Department office is in FOSTER HALL 275, 646-3611.  The department staff are Ms. Gloria Valencia and Ms. Lucille Casas.

DEPARTMENT CHAIR:     The Biology Department head is Dr. Marvin Bernstein.  His office is in FOSTER HALL 275 (X63611).
 

color:black;mso-bidi-font-weight:bold'>xeroxes of all graded assignments and exams from this course at least until you have received your final grade.

DEPARTMENT OFFICE:     The Biology Department office is in FOSTER HALL 275, 646-3611.  The department staff are Ms. Gloria Valencia and Ms. Lucille Casas.

DEPARTMENT CHAIR:     The Biology Department head is Dr. Marvin Bernstein.  His office is in FOSTER HALL 275 (X63611).